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  • Gerrit Eicker 08:11 on 21. January 2012 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Data Management, , GMC, , , , Google Message Continuity, , , Google Sky Map, Google Social Graph API, Google's Graveyard, , , , Needlebase, , Photo Editors, , Picnik, , , , , , ,   

    Google’s Graveyard 2012 

    More Google shut downs: Urchin, Social Graph API, Picnik, Needlebase, Sky Map, GMC; http://eicker.at/GooglesGraveyard2012

     
    • Gerrit Eicker 08:11 on 21. January 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Google: “Here’s an update on some products that will be merged, open-sourced, or phased out in the coming months: Google Message Continuity (GMC) … Current GMC customers will be able to use GMC for the duration of their contract and are encouraged to consider using Google Apps as their primary messaging and collaboration platform. – Google Sky Map … We will be open-sourcing Sky Map and are collaborating with Carnegie Mellon University in a partnership that will see further development of Sky Map as a series of student projects. – Needlebase: We are retiring this data management platform, which we acquired from ITA Software, on June 1, 2012. The technology is being evaluated for integration into Google’s other data-related initiatives. – Picnik: We acquired this online photo editor in 2010. We’re retiring the service on April 19, 2012 so the Picnik team can continue creating photo-editing magic across Google products. … Social Graph API – This API makes information about the public connections between people on the web available for developers. The API isn’t experiencing the kind of adoption we’d like, and is being deprecated as of today. It will be fully retired on April 20, 2012. – Urchin: In 2005 we acquired Urchin, whose online web analytics product became the foundation for Google Analytics, helping businesses of all sizes measure their websites and online marketing. We’re fully committed to building an industry-leading online analytics product, so we’re saying goodbye to the client-hosted version, known as Urchin Software. New Urchin Software licenses will no longer be available after March 2012.

      Google: “The success of Google Analytics has been incredibly rewarding and humbling, and we are very thankful for the support of our early Urchin customers and investors. The Urchin Software product has now been completely overshadowed by its tremendously popular offspring. And so, it is time that we now complete the cycle by officially retiring the Urchin Software product and focus exclusively on online analytics. On behalf of the original Urchin crew and Google, we thank you and hope that we can continue to serve you with amazing products. – Urchin has only been available during the past several years through Certified Urchin Resellers, and new sales will officially discontinue at the end of March 2012. We are encouraging Urchin users to migrate to Google Analytics, although expect that current installations of the software will continue to work fine on most systems for years to come. You can learn more about the retirement of this product on the Urchin Website.

      RWW: “As Larry Page said in yesterday’s earnings call, Google’s current focus is on speeding up its execution. To make way for its main teams, Google has been closing down and open-sourcing its less-used projects over the past year. – Many interesting projects have moved on to bigger and better things as open-source initiatives. The Android App Inventor found a home at MIT. Knol, once Google’s effort at a Wikipedia-like knowledge database, has become Annotum, a WordPress-based system. Google Body became Zygote Body, and now it, and even the 3D viewer software behind it, is open-source. Today, Google Sky Map goes open-source, and it will live on as a student-run project.”

      VB: “Looks like the picnic is officially over. Google announced today on its blog that it will be retiring the picnic-themed photo editing service Picnik in April of this year. – The news comes about a week after Flickr announced it will be dumping Picnik, which now seems like foreshadowing of the news that was released today. – If you use Picnik for your editing needs, you can download your images as a zip file with Picnik Takeout for the time being. You can also move your photos over to your Google+ page until the service shuts down on April 19.”

      TC: “Today’s culling follows this summer’s shut downs of Google Labs and most of the products internally developed by former acquisition Slide. While Google has long encouraged experimentation, its found itself overextended. The company needs all hands on deck fighting the wars for social, mobile, and the cloud. – Google typically reassigns employees from scrapped projects rather than fire them. The teams from Picnik and Sky Map could increase the concentration of product leaders working on Google+. With any luck they can give Google’s social network a more human feel.

      RWW: “Google announced today that it is closing a number of services that it wasn’t able to attract millions of users to without making any effort. The worst of the lot to lose are two: the Social Graph API and DIY data extraction service Needlebase. Following on the heels of the kitten-stomping-bad sunsetting of Postrank, these latest closures are really meaningful, even if the adoption of the services never was. … The worst loss to humanity at the hands of Google’s startup eating monster of late remains PostRank, which Google acquired this Summer. … It was captured by Google and refashioned as a mirror for the fairy’s hideous ogre sister Naked Self Interest, which the ogre (a publisher using Google Analytics) thought made her more beautiful and rich with pageviews, but which really only made her uglier and more vacuous every day. – I can’t believe they are killing Needlebase and the Social Graph API. I can believe it, of course, but I’m thankful that my cynicism is still thin enough that it hurts every time something like this happens again. There are only so many more tools like this on the web left to kill, though.

  • Gerrit Eicker 08:49 on 24. November 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Google's Graveyard, , , , RE<C,   

    Google’s Graveyard IV. 

    Google keeps on shutting down: Friend Connect, Knol, Gears, Search Timeline, RE<C; http://eicker.at/GooglesGraveyard11

     
    • Gerrit Eicker 08:49 on 24. November 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Google: “This is our third blog post in our off-season spring cleaning series. To recap, we’re in the process of shutting a number of products which haven’t had the impact we’d hoped for, integrating others as features into our broader product efforts, and ending several which have shown us a different path forward. Overall, our aim is to build a simpler, more intuitive, truly beautiful Google user experience. In terms of the details, here is the latest update: Google Bookmarks Lists, Google Friend Connect, Google Gears, Google Search Timeline, Google Wave, Knol, Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal (RE<C)[The Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal] initiative was developed as an effort to drive down the cost of renewable energy, with an RE<C engineering team focused on researching improvements to solar power technology. At this point, other institutions are better positioned than Google to take this research to the next level. So we’ve published our results to help others in the field continue to advance the state of power tower technology, and we’ve closed our efforts. We will continue our work to generate cleaner, more efficient energy – including our on-campus efforts, procuring renewable energy for our data centers, making our data centers even more efficient and investing more than $850 million in renewable energy technologies.

      GigaOM: “Why Google ditching its clean power research isn’t a big dealGoogle will still continue to invest in clean power projects, Google spokesperson Parag Chokshi tells me. Google has already invested $850 million into solar and wind projects in the U.S., like the world’s largest wind farm in Oregon, and solar rooftop funds from SolarCity and Clean Power Finance. … Google invests in clean power projects like these for two reasons: Google can get a low risk return on its investments in clean power. In the range of 12 percent or so for some projects, according to analysts I’ve interviewed (updated). Google also wants to be able to procure more clean power for its growing energy needs for its data centers, so backing some of these clean power projects can help with that.”

      TC: “Since Google CEO Larry Page took the helm this past spring, one of the company’s most visible initiatives has been to trim and shut down its products that haven’t taken off. These have included Aardvark, Google Desktop, Fast Flip, Code Search, Buzz, Jaiku, and even Google Labs – and today, it’s announcing a new batch of products that will be shut down in the coming months. … Knol, in particular, comes as something of a surprise to me – because I figured Google had already shut it down. … Google didn’t seem to allocate many resources to the project, and it certainly didn’t put much emphasis behind it from a press standpoint – I can’t remember the last time I was pitched on a new Knol feature or milestone. Knol will live on at Annotum.org, which is powered by WordPress and was built in collaboration with Solvitor and Crowd Favorite.

      WordPress: “Today, we’d like to give a warm welcome to Google Knol users who are migrating to WordPress.com. Begun in 2007, the Google Knol project has provided people in many fields with a place to share their knowledge and expertise with the world using a platform designed for scholarly authoring and publishing. … We here at WordPress.com are thrilled to provide an easy, fast way for Knol authors to move to their new homes without the need for configuring their own installation. And WordPress.com users who would like to start new sites powered by the Annotum platform can activate one of the two new Annotum-enabled themes on new blogs and get started right away. It’s yet another way the WordPress platform and WordPress.com are enabling the democratization of publishing and sharing of information with the world.

      Annotum: “We are pleased to announce the release of Annotum version 1.0 as a hosted theme on WordPress.com, a free theme on WordPress.org, and a freely available download on GitHub (forks welcome). I could write a long post about the many months of hard work by many people at Google, PLoS, NLM, Automattic, and particularly Crowd Favorite, all of whom deserve, and receive, my sincere thanks. But instead I want you to get started using this fantastic new tool to author and publish beautiful, peer-reviewed scholarly articles and journals.

    • Gust MEES 22:46 on 15. December 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Hi,

      WordPress-Annotum is a fantastic tool which I recommend to everybody who is in need to publish articles and posts with different co-authors, especially to educators and Universities as also to authors who want to publish together on specific themes…

      As a Knol Author I started a new WP-Annotum blog http://knolannotummigration.wordpress.com/ where Knol Authors could find some help about the migration as well as new WP-Annotum users will find some gems…

      Greetings: Gust

  • Gerrit Eicker 08:53 on 17. October 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Google Code Search, Google Code Search API, , Google Music, , , , , , Google Takeout, Google's Graveyard, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    Google’s Graveyard III. 

    Google shuts down: Buzz, Jaiku, iGoogle Features, Code Searchgoes music? http://eicker.at/GooglesGraveyard2011

     
    • Gerrit Eicker 08:53 on 17. October 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Google: “[W]e recently decided to shut down some products, and turn others into features of existing products. – Here’s the latest update on what’s happening: Code Search, which was designed to help people search for open source code all over the web, will be shut down along with the Code Search API on January 15, 2012. – In a few weeks we’ll shut down Google Buzz and the Buzz API, and focus instead on Google+. While people obviously won’t be able to create new posts after that, they will be able to view their existing content on their Google Profile, and download it using Google Takeout. – Jaiku, a product we acquired in 2007 that let users send updates to friends, will shut down on January 15, 2012. We’ll be working to enable users to export their data from Jaiku. – Several years ago, we gave people the ability to interact socially on iGoogle. With our new focus on Google+, we will remove iGoogle’s social features on January 15, 2012. iGoogle itself, and non-social iGoogle applications, will stay as they are. – The University Research Program for Google Search, which provides API access to our search results for a small number of approved academic researchers, will close on January 15, 2012. – In addition, later today the Google Labs site will shut down, and as previously announced, Boutiques.com and the former Like.com websites will be replaced by Google Product Search. – Changing the world takes focus on the future, and honesty about the past. We learned a lot from products like Buzz, and are putting that learning to work every day in our vision for products like Google+. Our users expect great things from us; today’s announcements let us focus even more on giving them something truly awesome.

      Horowitz: “What did we learn from Buzz? Plenty. We learned privacy is not a feature… it is foundational to the product. And this awareness gave us the resolve to design privacy in from the very beginning, which led to Circles for sharing the right information with the right people, as well as transparency around which parts of your profile can be seen by whom. We also learned how compelling it is to have meaningful conversations with interesting people, which we’re happy to see happening all the time in Google+. – But probably the best lesson we learned is about how to introduce a product. We started very slowly with Google+ – in a limited Field Trial – in order to listen and learn and gather plenty of real-world feedback. Your participation in the process is helping create what Google+ is today.”

      GigaOM: “Has Google really learned that much from Buzz and Jaiku?Is that because Google wants to be social, or is it because the company wants to be able to including being able to sell you things? The existence of Google+ seems to have more to do with the company’s need to harvest the “social signals” that emerge from such networks in order to improve its search and advertising business – and fend off Facebook – than Google’s desire to create a welcoming environment for social sharing. An engineer for the company described not that long ago how Google has no real interest in social networking for its own sake, but saw it as an information-harvesting strategy.Does Google have an ‘if we build it, they will come’ problem? … The amount of resources that Google is putting into Google+ is admirable, and it is good to focus on one thing, even if it means beheading other services like Buzz and Jaiku – and CEO Larry Page has made it clear that he wants the network to succeed. But wanting something and having it come true are very different things, and Google could well learn another lesson from Google+: that even if you build it, and it is well-designed from an engineering perspective, people may still not come.

      RWW: “Even though Google Buzz wasn’t terribly good at anything, from a user standpoint, we at least enjoyed its developer-centric nature. It was all about open data. That may have been all it had going for it, but that meant something. Its replacement, Google Plus, is awfully slick and smooth and secretive. The few APIs released so far barely enable developers to make anything, much less anything interesting. – Google sure is a busy place. Its whole business is undergoing rapid transformations, even if its quarterly earnings are reported so generally that they seem stable. – Google is spending money and changing shape. It’s launching social networks and buying handset manufacturers. It’s hiring new people, buying new infrastructure, and now it’s shedding old products. When will Google start to break a sweat?

      NYT: “Five months after it introduced a cloud music service with limited capabilities, Google is in negotiations with the major record labels to expand that service and also open an MP3 store that would compete with Apple and Amazon. – According to numerous music executives, Google is eager to open the store in the next several weeks. It would most likely be connected to Google’s existing cloud service, Music Beta, which lets people back up their songs on remote servers and stream them to mobile phones and other devices, said these executives, who all spoke on condition of anonymity because the talks were private and continuing. … Music Beta was announced five weeks after Amazon opened a similar unlicensed service, Cloud Drive. – Apple got licenses for iTunes Match, which will instantly link a user’s songs to Apple’s master collection. With an unlicensed service, users must upload each song individually, a process that can take hours or even days.

      RWW: “Google reportedly had a hard time shoring up deals with music labels ahead of the initial launch of Google Music, so they launched it anyway. Traditional content owners have often been wary of Google, who has gained a reputation among some legacy media organizations as being too soft on piracy. The company has extended a few olive branches recently, making public efforts to discourage copyright infringement and buttering up media executives. … Google has an uphill battle to fight if it expects to take on Apple in this space. Amazon might provide a fairer fight. Either way, Google is hoping to bolt additional revenue streams onto its business model, which remains heavily bolstered by the money it makes search advertising.”

  • Gerrit Eicker 08:36 on 4. September 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Google Desktop, , Google Maps API for Flash, , Google Pack, , , Google Subcribed Links, Google Web Security, Google's Graveyard, , Image Labeler, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    Google’s Graveyard II. 

    Google once again expands its graveyard: Aardvark, Desktop, Fast Flip, Notebook, Sidewiki; http://eicker.at/GooglesGraveyard

     
    • Gerrit Eicker 08:37 on 4. September 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Google: “Technology improves, people’s needs change, some bets pay off and others don’t. So, as Larry previewed on our last earnings call, today we’re having a fall spring-clean at Google. – Over the next few months we’ll be shutting down a number of products and merging others into existing products as features. … This will make things much simpler for our users, improving the overall Google experience. It will also mean we can devote more resources to high impact products—the ones that improve the lives of billions of people. All the Googlers working on these projects will be moved over to higher-impact products. As for our users, we’ll communicate directly with them as we make these changes, giving sufficient time to make the transition and enabling them to take their data with them. … Aardvark, Desktop, FastFlip, Google Maps API for Flash, Google Pack, Google Web Security, Image Labeler, Notebook, Sidewiki, Subscribed Links

      VB: “Under the direction of new CEO Larry Page, Google declared that it would re-prioritize its product offerings. Part of that includes the shut down of Google Labs, what Google previously referred to as ‘a playground where our more adventurous users can play around with prototypes of some of our wild and crazy ideas.’ – Aardvark was acquired by Google for $50 million back in February 2010. The service let users ask and answer questions from people in their personal social network through a Google Chat window. A day after the acquisition news came through, Aardvark was moved to Google Labs. – Google says although Aardvark is closing, Google will ‘continue to work on tools that enable people to connect and discover richer knowledge about the world.’ The Aardvark team appears to have moved most of its focus to the Google+ social network.”

      GigaOM: “Google’s doing a bit of house cleaning today, announcing on its blog that it’s shutting down a handful of properties and projects, including a big one they shelled out $50 million for. Social search company Aardvark is getting the axe just 18 months after being acquired. The explanation? It was just an experiment. It’s also a sign that Google is beginning to sharpen its focus on meaningful projects. Today’s news follows the closing of Slide, Google Health, Google Power Meter, Google Labs, and others since Larry Page became CEO in January.”

      TC: “Well, it looks like the brooms and axes are out at Google today, for a little late-summer cleaning. The company announced via its blog today that some of its products and features will be riding into the sunset in the very near future. This news was previewed by CEO Larry Page on Google’s quarterly earnings call in July, who said at the time that the search giant would be doing a wee bit of spring, er, early fall cleaning.

      TNW: “All Google Notesbooks content is being rolled into Google Docs, the company announced today, as part of a wider revelation that it is pulling the plug on several of its popular products. Google Notebook enabled people to combine clipped URLs from the web and free-form notes into documents they could share and publish.

  • Gerrit Eicker 08:23 on 6. August 2010 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , Google's Graveyard, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    Google’s Graveyard 

    Google expands its graveyard for Wave. The core question: what is next? Buzz? http://j.mp/GooglesGraveyard

     
  • Gerrit Eicker 11:08 on 15. January 2009 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Google Catalog Search, , Google Video, Google's Graveyard, , ,   

    More Google Shut Downs 

    Google shuts down Video, Catalog Search, Notebook, Jaiku, Dodgeball, all following Lively; http://cli.gs/DHjgvE  

     
    • Gerrit Eicker 11:10 on 15. January 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Kincaid: “It’s unclear at this point if this is the start of a new trend: has Google slashed all it’s going to in the upcoming months, or are the future of its less popular products in doubt? Knol, Google’s Wikipedia competitor, has largely failed to catch on. And what about Grand Central – the advanced telecom service that has a devout fan base, but still hasn’t been released to the general public?”

      Rubel: “None of these products makes Google a dime and it has me wondering what the future is for Google Reader. … If Google chooses to run ads in Google Reader, that creates an issue. Lots of publishers run ads in their feeds. If Google is competing against these with its own contextual ads in in Reader then what? It might just be easier for them to shut it down. Thank God for OPML exporting. – All I am saying is: don’t bet that Google Reader will stay the same.

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