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  • Gerrit Eicker 11:01 on 5. November 2008 Permalink
    Tags: , McCain, , , , ,   

    The Digital Impact 

    Sharkey: “Obama and McCain have done a fantastic job of activating the digital media space“; http://is.gd/6obN  

     
    • Gerrit Eicker 11:15 on 5. November 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Snyder: “Obama acted quite differently. Having opted-out of his promise to abide by campaign finance laws (which proved to be one of his shrewdest and smartest moves), he went for broke. His campaign started pouring millions of dollars into opening scores of campaign offices in all 50 states, many in areas that Democrats hadn’t contested in decades. In the traditionally GOP-favoring Colorado, Obama set up 59 campaign offices to McCain’s 13. – Why did he take this expensive gamble? Because of the internet and rise of social media, this was the first time where it actually made sense to run a 50-state campaign. In the past, each party would focus its efforts in getting out the vote in its respective solid ‘D’ or solid ‘R’ states and pour hundred of millions of dollars fighting it out over a handful of ‘battleground states’. – This time around, everyone counted. And given the power of social media, everyone who has the interest has the ability to influence and mobilize networks of friends. A blue dot in a sea of red could now make a real impact, both vote-wise and dollar-wise, to a presidential campaign. Obama got this and McCain really didn’t.”

    • Gerrit Eicker 11:39 on 5. November 2008 Permalink | Reply

      iht: “‘What is striking here is not the dominance of any one medium, but the integration of various channels,’ said Lee Rainie, the director of the Pew Internet and American Life Project. By the time the conventions rolled around, some networks realized the game had changed. Couric christened her own YouTube channel and was turned loose in Web extras. But network news divisions are expensive operations based on a television business model. They can’t be run on the relatively small money that online advertising draws but they can’t compete for audiences if they ignore the Web.

    • Gerrit Eicker 15:09 on 5. November 2008 Permalink | Reply

      TR: “The viral Internet offered myriad ways to propagate unfiltered Obama messages. The campaign posted the candidate’s speeches and linked to multimedia material generated by supporters. A music video set to an Obama speech – ‘Yes We Can,’ by the hip-hop artist Will.i.am – has been posted repeatedly on YouTube, but the top two postings alone have been viewed 10 million times. A single YouTube posting of Obama’s March 18 speech on race has been viewed more than four million times. Similarly, the campaign regularly sent out text messages (at Obama rallies, speakers frequently asked attendees to text their contact information to his campaign) and made sure that Obama was prominent on other social-networking sites, such as Facebook and MySpace. The campaign even used the micro­blogging service Twitter, garnering about 50,000 Obama ‘followers’ who track his short posts. ‘The campaign, consciously or unconsciously, became much more of a media operation than simply a presidential campaign, because they recognized that by putting their message out onto these various platforms, their supporters would spread it for them,’ says Andrew Rasiej, founder of the Personal Democracy Forum, a website covering the intersection of politics and technology (and another Dean alumnus). ‘We are going from the era of the sound bite to the sound blast.‘”

  • Gerrit Eicker 10:29 on 5. November 2008 Permalink
    Tags: , , McCain, ,   

    Welcome Back, Voters! 

    Welcome back, voters! – 1996: 96,456,345, 2000: 105,586,274, 2004: 122,295,345, 2008: 133,917,120; http://is.gd/6o58  

     
  • Gerrit Eicker 09:55 on 27. August 2008 Permalink
    Tags: , , McCain, , , , ,   

    Obama vs. McCain: Social Media vs. Classical Media? 

    If you believe that Obama dominates the Web: you’re right. But that’s not the whole story; http://is.gd/1Xdv

     
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