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  • Gerrit Eicker 08:02 on 22. November 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Copycats, , , , Easy, Easy Marketing, , , , , , , , Myth, , , , , , , , , , TINSTAAFL,   

    Easy Marketing is a Myth 

    Easy marketing is: spam, with no entry barriers, temporary, an escalation of force – expensive; http://eicker.at/EasyMarketing

     
  • Gerrit Eicker 08:26 on 20. November 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , Burn Rate, , , , , , , , , , Free Market, Free Services, , , , , , Milton Friedman, , , , , , , , , , , TANSTAAFL, There Is No Such Thing As A Free Lunch, TINSTAAFL, ,   

    TINSTAAFL 

    There Is No Such Thing As A Free Lunch: and there is no exception for #TINSTAAFL on the Internet; http://eicker.at/TINSTAAFL

     
    • Gerrit Eicker 08:27 on 20. November 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Guardian: “Physics has Newton’s first law (‘Every body persists in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by force impressed’). The equivalent for internet services is simpler, though just as general in its applicability: it says that there is no such thing as a free lunch.The strange thing is that most users of Google, Facebook, Twitter and other ‘free’ services seem to be only dimly aware of this law. … But it costs money – millions of dollars a month, every month. The monthly amount is called the ‘burn rate’. … It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that the best way to get big fast is to offer your services for free. … The penny drops for most suckers, er, users when it occurs to them that the service is, somehow, becoming more intrusive – whether through abrupt changes in default privacy settings, or sudden changes in the way their update and news feeds are reconfigured. What started as a lovely, simple, clean interface suddenly starts to look very cluttered and, well, manipulative. … It doesn’t have to be like this, of course. It just needs a different business model in which users pay modest fees for online services.

      Wikipedia: “‘There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch’ (alternatively, ‘There’s no such thing as a free lunch’ or other variants) is a popular adage communicating the idea that it is impossible to get something for nothing. The acronyms TANSTAAFL and TINSTAAFL are also used. Uses of the phrase dating back to the 1930s and 1940s have been found, but the phrase’s first appearance is unknown. The ‘free lunch’ in the saying refers to the nineteenth century practice in American bars of offering a ‘free lunch’ as a way to entice drinking customers. The phrase and the acronym are central to Robert Heinlein’s 1966 libertarian science fiction novel The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, which popularized it. The free-market economist Milton Friedman also popularized the phrase by using it as the title of a 1975 book, and it often appears in economics textbooks; Campbell McConnell writes that the idea is ‘at the core of economics’. … TINSTAAFL demonstrates opportunity cost. Greg Mankiw described the concept as: ‘To get one thing that we like, we usually have to give up another thing that we like. Making decisions requires trading off one goal against another.’ The idea that there is no free lunch at the societal level applies only when all resources are being used completely and appropriately, i.e., when economic efficiency prevails. If not, a ‘free lunch’ can be had through a more efficient utilisation of resources. If one individual or group gets something at no cost, somebody else ends up paying for it. If there appears to be no direct cost to any single individual, there is a social cost. Similarly, someone can benefit for ‘free’ from an externality or from a public good, but someone has to pay the cost of producing these benefits. – In the sciences, TINSTAAFL means that the universe as a whole is ultimately a closed system – there is no magic source of matter, energy, light, or indeed lunch, that does not draw resources from something else, and will not eventually be exhausted.”

  • Gerrit Eicker 09:15 on 29. October 2011 Permalink
    Tags: , , API Charge, , , Charge, , , , , Google APIs Console, , Google Maps API, Google Maps API FAQ, Google Maps API Premier, Google Maps API Premier License, Google Maps API TOS, Google Maps API Usage, Google Maps Charge, Google Maps Usage, , , , , , , , TINSTAAFL, , , ,   

    Google Maps Charge 

    Google adds a limit on free Google Maps API: over 25,000 daily and you’re charged; http://eicker.at/GoogleMapsCharge

     
    • Gerrit Eicker 09:15 on 29. October 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Google: “When the Maps API Terms of Service were updated in April of this year we announced that usage limits would be introduced to the Maps API starting on October 1st. With October upon us, I’d like to provide an update on how these limits are being introduced, and the impact it will have on your Maps API sites. The usage limits that now apply to Maps API sites are documented in the Maps API FAQ. However no site exceeding these limits will stop working immediately. We understand that developers need time to evaluate their usage, determine if they are affected, and respond if necessary. There are three options available for sites that are exceeding the limits: Reduce your usage to below the limits, Opt-in to paying for your excess usage at the rates given in the FAQ, Purchase a Maps API Premier license – To assist in evaluating whether your site is exceeding the usage limits we will shortly be adding the Maps API to the Google APIs Console. Once available you will be able to track your usage in the APIs Console by providing an APIs Console key when you load the Maps API. … We understand that the introduction of these limits may be concerning. However with the continued growth in adoption of the Maps API we need to secure its long term future by ensuring that even when used by the highest volume for-profit sites, the service remains viable. By introducing these limits we are ensuring that Google can continue to offer the Maps API for free to the vast majority of developers for many years to come.

      Google: “What usage limits apply to the Maps API? Web sites and applications using each of the Maps API may at no cost generate: up to 25,000 map loads per day for each API, up to 2,500 map loads per day that have been modified using the Styled Maps feature…”

      Google: “How much will excess map loads purchased online cost? Applications generating map load volumes below the usage limits can use the Maps API at no cost providing the application meets the requirements of the Google Maps API Terms of Service. Excess map loads over the usage limits are priced as follows [for 1,000 excess map loads]: JS Maps API v3: $4, JS Maps API v3 styled maps: $4/$8, Static Maps API: $4, Static Maps API styled maps: $4/$8, Street View Image API: $4, JS Maps API v2: $10 – Excess map loads will not be offered online for the Maps API for Flash. Sites using the Maps API for Flash and exceeding the usage limits should migrate to the JS Maps API v3, or purchase a Maps API Premier license.”

      Guardian: “Nothing free lasts forever; and it’s damn hard to make money putting ads on maps. That seems to be the conclusion to draw from Google’s decision to put limits on its Google Maps API. … 25,000 isn’t that many calls. – Although won’t immediately be cutting off those whose applications exceed the call rate, it’s clear that the easy days are over. And of course it also raises the question of whether Google has found that it’s too hard to monetise maps, or that the API calls are bypassing the best ways it has of monetising them. … Obviously, Google, as a business, is free to charge as and how it wants. But it will be interesting to see if this changes how developers approach the use of the maps APIs.”

      Wired: “Bad news, map hackers; the Google Maps free ride may be coming to and end. … The bad news is that once your app or website exceeds those limits you’ll be forking out $4 for every 1,000 people that hit your site (or view a map in your mobile app). Alternately, developers can cough up $10,000+ for a Google Maps API Premier licence, which, in addition to the unlimited access offers more advanced geocoding tools, tech support, and control over any advertising shown. … In other words, Google appears to be interested mainly in collecting fees from sites with consistently heavy traffic rather than experiments that see a one-time traffic spike. It doesn’t protect against every potentially expensive use case, but it should make map mashup fans breathe a little easier. – Developers worried about the potential costs of the Google Maps API can always use OpenStreetMap, which is free and, in many parts of the world, much more detailed than Google Maps. Of course, OpenStreetMap lacks some Google Maps features, most notably an equivalent to Street View.”

      AT: “Google’s approach to enforcement will likely not be very aggressive. According to the FAQ, sites that hit the rate limit and aren’t configured to pay overage fees will not immediately be cut off. This suggests that sites with an occasional traffic spike aren’t the intended target-Google is mainly looking to collect cash from sites with a consistently heavy load.

      PW: “Unfortunately, the price for styled maps could impact many more developers. Perhaps Google is charging for what it knows is a unique feature amongst its competitors. The feature is also likely extremely computation-intensive, which means it costs Google quite a bit more to provide that service.

    • Gerrit Eicker 14:28 on 22. November 2011 Permalink | Reply

      Google: “Understanding how the Maps API usage limits affect your sites – We recognise that sites may occasionally experience spikes in traffic that cause them to exceed the daily usage limits for a short period of time. For example, a media site that uses a map to illustrate a breaking news story, or a map-based data visualization that goes viral across social networks, may start to generate higher traffic volumes. In order to accommodate such bursts in popularity, we will only enforce the usage limits on sites that exceed them for 90 consecutive days. Once that criteria is met, the limits will be enforced on the site from that point onwards, and all subsequent excess usage will cause the site to incur charges. – Please be aware that Maps API applications developed by non-profit organisations, applications deemed by Google to be in the public interest, and applications based in countries where we do not support Google Checkout transactions or offer Maps API Premier are exempt from these usage limits. We will publish a process by which sites can apply for an exemption on the basis of the above criteria prior to enforcement of the limits commencing. Non-profit organizations are also encouraged to apply for a Google Earth Outreach grant, which provides all the additional benefits of a full Maps API Premier license. … To help you measure your site’s Maps API usage, we have now added the Maps API to the Google APIs Console.

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